Category Archives: Furniture Makeovers

Scoop Chair

I did it again! (As if there were any doubts.) I hunted down a fun piece of furniture on the side of the road to redo. This time my victim was a mid-century scoop chair. With only a few bumps and scratches, repainting this chair was easy peasy.

scoop chair 1

1. First, using a screw driver, I removed the legs.

scoop chair 3

2. Next, I applied two coats of Rust-oleum Specialty Plastic white spray paint on the seat.

I was a little hesitant to paint the seat because I kinda liked the original color, but the seat was so scuffed up it needed to be painted.

scoop chair 2

I chose white instead of blue because, well let’s just face it, everything in my house is pretty much black, white and gray.

As I was painting, the seat started to get this interesting cloud look to it, but I have no need for cloud chair, so I continued spraying.

3. Then, using Blue Hawk Rust Resistant spray paint in black, I coated the legs.

4. Finally, after a little drying time, I reassembled the chair.

scoop chair 4

Yay! I Love how it turned out! That was as easy as 1, 2, 3… 4.

 

Linked up with East Coast Creative #cwts2014

Painting Upholstery

Have you ever found a project and thought to yourself “I can do that?” And then you tried it out and it was a complete failure? No? Me neither.

Just kidding. The great thing is when you do a project and it turns out pretty awesome, even though somewhere along the way you may have wanted to set it on fire. What’s that you say? You haven’t wanted to do that either? Well, then you are lucky. Anyway, this is a story about awesome things that almost got set on fire. Enter the painted barcalounger…

Painting Upholstery 1

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Isn’t she purdy?

I actually started out with two of these puppies. You may remember this photo from awhile back. (Don’t bother looking for the post. It disappeared into oblivion when we lost all of our blog posts {mentioned here}. That is a lesson on backing things up!)

2 Green Chairs

We scored both of the chairs on Craigslist for FREE. Yes, you read that right. And they were is great condition. No funky smell. No nasty stains. Only a small amount of dust and hair clung on for its life as I vacuumed them off.

A while ago, while perusing {Pinterest}, I found a photo of a beautiful upholstered wing-back chair {by Kristy Swain of Hyphen Interiors} that had been painted with latex and acrylic paints, of all things, and immediately knew I wanted to work that kind of magic on my own set of twins. Plus it is a much more inexpensive option than reupholstering.

I decided to see if anyone else had painted their upholstery and there were a ton of tutorials out there, so I figured that this was totally a project I could pull off. I gathered my supplies.

These included:

– One quart of Glidden Satin Latex Paint in Granite Gray
{Ceramcoat Textile Medium}

Painting Upholstery 2

Also:

– a spray bottle filled with water
– a disposable cup to mix the paint in
– a paint brush
– white semi-gloss paint for the legs (already owned)

These supplies were based mostly on Kristy’s process, minus the acrylic paint, after I read about several successes using only latex.

Then it was time to get to work. I started by removing the head and arm rest covers (do those things have a real name?) and pulled the seat cushion off as well so that I could paint it independently. Next, I mixed my paint with the textile medium and some water in a 1:1:1 ratio. With the spray bottle, I spritzed the water onto the fabric of the back rest and used my paint brush to spread the mixture onto the fabric. You can see below that the first coat looks like it is going on decently, considering I was painting a light color onto a darker fabric.

Painting Upholstery 3

I spritzed and painted until the entire chair was covered, making sure to get in all of the nooks and crannies with my brush. Then it was time for a break so that everything could dry and I could make lunch.

One salad and five gluten free pretzels later, I headed back to check on the drying process and that’s when I started to freak out. It looked like there was the slightest bit of dust on the chair, but not any sort of noticeable difference in color. I didn’t even take a photo because there was nothing to photograph. The chair literally looked the same, like the right side of the photo above.

I mixed up some more paint, medium, and water, this time changing things up a bit and using a 1:1:1/2 ratio and hoping that this would allow for a bit more coverage. Spritz and paint and wait. Again, when I came back, it only looked as if someone had sprinkled a light dusting of baby powder on top of the chair. Grrrrrr. It was time for someone to light the fire, because this chair was going to burn. I could only imagine how many more coats I was going to have to do to make any sort of impact.  10? 20? 100? So I waited. And waited. A couple a of days actually.

I knew I couldn’t give up on this chair, so after some whining to my husband and sister, I again mixed up my paint, medium and water, but opted not to use the spray bottle with water. That, my friends, was the secret to my success, because the next coat was definitely showing some decent coverage. Just a little green showing through.

Painting Upholstery 4

One more coat after that and I was done. Finally, my green chair was gray. I slapped some white paint on the legs and once that was dry…

Painting Upholstery 6

I used a hair dryer to heat set the medium, which seemed to make the finish a little more pliable.

Painting Upholstery 5

This chair is so lucky that I had a little perseverance and with a little more, it’s twin sister will get the same treatment so that we will have two GRAY barcaloungers.

Painting Upholstery 1
We love the way this chair turned out, regardless of the blood, sweat and tears that went into it. Parent approved and kid tested.  Hmmm… I wonder how spill resistant it is???

Painting Upholstery 7

Things to note:

1. I would describe the texture of the chair as being similar to waterproofed outdoor fabric. It is a bit plastic-y, but still squishy and very comfortable to sit in.

2. My theory is that the final texture of the chair has a lot to do with the beginning texture. My fabric was fairly stiff and rough to start out with, so a more plush fabric may produce a softer finish. No guarantees on this though.

3. I used four 8 oz. bottles of fabric medium and one quart of latex paint, which equaled four grueling  coats of paint. This amount would have been less had I done fewer coats with my newly figured out mixture. (1:1:1/2 ratio of paint, medium, and water with no spray water bottle added.)

4. Use a coupon. I could have spent around $12 less if I would have utilized coupons from my local craft store. Doh! You can even load a lot of them onto your phone with the right apps!

5. The kind of chair I chose to use may not have been the best candidate for this project. Barcaloungers move and lounge (duh!) and have foot rests, so a stationary chair may be a better choice because it will have less surface area to cover. This will definitely be something I take into consideration in my future upholstery painting projects.

Moral of the story:  If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.  We would love for you to share your upholstery painting stories with us if you end up trying this out!

Numbered Counter Stools

These stools are another curb find. I attempted to sell them at 2 different garage sales and there were no takers. After our last sale, I brought them into the house and my son loved being able to sit at the counter to “help” make dinner. Their original look didn’t match anything in our home, so I opted to give them a makeover to match our {dining table.} I also decided to jump aboard the numeral infatuation train my sister is conducting.

Counter Stools 1

First, I sanded them and I sanded some more. Once I thought I might be done sanding, I sanded them one last time. Next, I primed the legs.

Counter Stools 2

Then, I gave them two coats of latex paint. To keep the legs bright white, I draped the base of the stools with a plastic drop cloth.

Counter Stools 3

After that, I stained the seat with Minwax Special Walnut.

Counter Stools 4

Using the same technique Erin used in her {Numbered Wooden Crates,}  I painted a 1 and a 2. Finally, I slapped 4 coats of Minwax Water Based Polycrylic on the seats. Yeah! Now they go with the rest of the kitchen!

Counter Stools 5
What do you pick up off the side of the road?

Linked up with East Coast Creative #cwts2014

Range Hood Makeover

This month marks the four year anniversary that we have lived in this house. When we moved in, it was like traveling back to 1984, the year the house was built. We are slowly making updates to bring it to present time.

Our kitchen has changed the most. The cabinets were originally stained oak, in need of updating. First, I decided to paint them green. I didn’t hate the green, but it did look like Dr. Seuss lived here. A year later, my grey obsession took over and I repainted them. We had the grey for two years and were ready to brighten things up, so once again I got out my rollers and brushes and this time painted them white.

With white cabinets and black appliances, my 1980’s almond colored range hood suck out like a sore thumb. After doing a little research, we decided spray painting it was the best option for us.

Vent 2

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I was very hesitant to spray paint in the house, as I had never done anything like this before. So I tried to remove it. After about 2 minutes, I could tell that was not going to happen. I took a little break, gave my self a pep talk, and tried to erase the thought of black over spray all over my bright white cabinets out of my head.

Then, it was back to work as I cleaned, lightly sanded, and wiped off all dust on the vent. I covered literally everything near the hood with a plastic drop cloth, secured by painters tape.

Vent 4

Vent 5 vent 3
After spray painting a couple coats, I removed the drop cloth to reveal my pretty hood.

vent6

Ain’t it purdy? Now if only I could figure out what to hang on the wall between the hood and stove. Any ideas?